Chaplaincy

Chaplaincy and the Methodist Church

The Methodist Church has a long history of chaplaincy work going back to the time of the Wesleys and you will find Methodist Chaplains in some quite surprising places.  Chaplaincy schemes may be supported and run by the local Church, the Circuit, the District or the Connexion, but there is always some sense in which the chaplain is "sent" by the Church. Chaplains always work with the support of the Church - they are never alone.

What kind of people are chaplains?

There are many different kinds of Methodist chaplains.  Most are volunteers - ordained ministers working full time as chaplains are very much in the minority.   A Chaplain could be a visitor at the hospital, part of a team who talk to the staff in the shopping centre or someone who meets with students and staff at the local College.

  • What is Chaplaincy?ChaplaincyAn introduction to the history, activities and marks of chaplaincy.Read more  
  • Chaplaincy EverywhereChaplaincy EverywhereResources to help explore chaplaincy as a means of engaging in God's mission.Read more  
  • Chaplaincy Everywhere NewsE-newsletter, keeping you up-to-date with news from the chaplaincy world.Read more  
  • Further ResourcesChaplaincy EssentialsChaplaincy Essentials course and other resources for exploring further.Read more  
  • Chaplaincy ContactsSignpost bearing word 'chaplaincy'Who to contact regarding various areas of chaplaincy.Read more  
  • Sign up for Chaplaincy Everywhere E-NewsNews, resources, share your stories

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A small group resource for nurturing engagement in God's mission through chaplaincy

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Chaplaincy in the RAF

Watch a video shown at the 2014 Methodist Conference. Padre Chris Acher describes his motivation to become a military chaplain, and his experiences with the RAF in Afghanistan.

"Chaplains are... the church that has left the building... We can all be involved in chaplaincy."

Martyn Atkins - General Secretary of the  Methodist Church in Britain

Read articles from the Epworth Review Chaplaincy issue December 2010