Using Zoom safely

'Zoom bombing' is when unwanted people join your Zoom meeting and then disrupt it - often by sharing graphic pornography.

Follow these simple steps and avoid horrible experiences.

1. Never put the Zoom joining link, the Meeting ID or the Password on social media or a website

  • Instead send these to participants directly by email
  • Tell them not to share these details on social media or any website.
  • When advertising your service or event, ask people to request the joining link, providing an email address for requests to be sent to.



2: Use the Zoom Waiting Room

3: Disable participant screen sharing

  • At the start of the meeting the host needs to click the 'up' arrow next to ‘Share Screen’ in the toolbar and then on ‘Advanced Sharing Options. When the Advanced Sharing Option screen opens, change the ‘Who can Share?’ setting to ‘Only Host’. If the meeting requires others to share documents, email these to the host so that they display them.

    See https://blog.zoom.us/keep-uninvited-guests-out-of-your-zoom-event/    


4: Once everyone is in, lock the meeting

If everyone has joined your meeting and you are not inviting anyone else, you should lock the meeting so that nobody else can join. See https://blog.zoom.us/spotlight-security/

In the unlikely event that troublemakers do gain access, expel them.

In the participants menu, you can hover your cursor over a participant’s name, and several options will appear, including Remove. Click that to remove a participant from the meeting. They are unable to get back in if you then click Lock Meeting. See https://blog.zoom.us/spotlight-security/

Note: Sometimes troublemakers have been known to fake the identities of people already in a meeting to trick the host into letting them in again, so watch out for that

 


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