FAQs about supervision

 

What is Reflective Supervision and why is the church investing in it?
Who is the Connexional Team contact for issues connected to supervision?
When will I start receiving supervision?
Who will supervise me and who decides?
Who can train to be a supervisor and how will that work?

Can I be part of the Responsible Grace (RG) training team? 
How is supervision different from (a) line management, (b) coaching, (c) spiritual direction, (d) counselling?
How will I fit supervision in with everything else?

What is the relationship between supervision and safeguarding?
Is supervision confidential?
Can we use group supervision?
Can I train as a professional supervisor? 
What happens if I refuse to sign my agreed supervision record? 
How can Circuit Stewards and others feed into the Supervision Process? 
How does supervision relate to the re-invitation process? 
Can I be exempt from any part of the Supervision training? 
How do I train to supervise a probationer from 2021 onwards? 
If I am already trained to supervise probationers what further training do I need?
What is the relationship between supervision and Ministerial Development Review?
If I work part-time, what do I need to know in relation to supervision?  
I am going on sabbatical - should I still attend/provide supervision?
I am on parental leave - what should I do?
What should I do if I am off sick?
I have been suspended - what should happen?
I am a chaplain in a Methodist Independent School - should I be in supervision?
I am a minister with permission to reside overseas - should I be in supervision?
I am a minister with permission to serve in an appointment outside the control of the Church - should I be in supervision?
I am a minister with permission to be without appointment - should I be in supervision?
I am a chaplain to the armed forces - what should I do?
Ordained ministers who are Recognised and Regarded, Authorised to Serve or Associates.
I am a Pioneer Minister - should I be in supervision?
I am a Mission Partner - should I be in supervision?
Who should be on a Supervision Implementation Plan (SIP)?
My role is split - who should offer supervision?

I am a Supernumerary - do I need to be in supervision?
How does Covid-19 affect supervision arrangements?
My supervisee is leaving the British Connexion to return to their original sending context. What do I do with their records?  

How are supervision records handled?

 

 

What is Reflective Supervision and why is the church investing in it?

In 2015 the Methodist Church in Britain introduced a system of structured reflective supervision for all our clergy. The hope being to provide a regular space of supportive accountability for our ministers that would:

  • support ministers in their vocation and practice of ministry,
  • safeguard the interest of those amongst whom ministry is exercised, including children and vulnerable adults and
  • ensure that ministry offered in the name of the church is collegially and accountably reflected upon in the light of God’s mission and the purposes of the Methodist Church

We have noted some 6 years later that the result of such an investment includes the following:

  • Increased clergy wellbeing
  • Reduced clergy anxiety
  • Increased trust within the life of the church
  • Strengthened boundaries and role clarity for ministers and those in oversight
  • Increased clergy capability around dealing with conflict, change and other complex dynamics
  • Emboldened clergy ready to take appropriate risks in mission
  • Clergy who are encouraged to intervene at an early stage around challenging practices that cause harm

As a consequence the Methodist Conference of 2021 has approved the Supervision Policy (2021-26) which outlines its commitment to reflective supervision in the church. The policy can be found here. Much more information about Supervision and the church can be found on the dedicated Supervision pages of this site.

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Who is the Connexional Team contact for issues connected to supervision?

The responsibility for Supervision sits with the Ministries Vocation & Worship team overseen by the Interim Director of Ministries, Paul Wood. The team has within it a Ministry Development Officer (MDO) dedicated to this work, Jane Bingham, and they can be contacted through binghamj@methodistchurch.org.uk or on 07799 900487.

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When will I start receiving supervision?

It is the responsibility of the District Chair to oversee the completion of a Supervision Implementation Plan (SIP) that lists the names of all ministers in the district and ensure that each one has a designated supervisor in place. All ministers should be in supervision at this point (summer 2021) and any who find themselves without dedicated supervision arrangements should contact their Chair to establish why they are not being supported through this route. If ministers without supervision are unable to get a satisfactory response they are invited to contact the dedicated MDO for further advice. 

The SIP will also cover specific lay roles as articulated in the policy from September 2022 onwards and any already in hand as a result of District decision making.

Trainee supervisors not currently in supervision for whatever reason may require additional arrangements and information can be found in the appropriate FAQ below.

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Who will supervise me and who decides?

Ministers are supervised by a fully trained and accredited supervisor who has completed the recognised course mandated by the church or holds approved external qualifications recognised by the church and who have been briefed in the Methodist Church ethos and approach. Utilising the District SIP the District Chair and/or appointed District Officers will decide the basic pattern that the district uses to determine the supervisory arrangements. Prior to the summer of 2021 some districts adopted a model whereby the minister in oversight, typically the superintendent minister or the District Chair, was automatically designated as the supervisor whilst others offered a different approach. In the Supervision Policy (2021-26) a period of grace around arrangements has been suggested and districts have been invited to look again at how they best match Supervisors and Supervisees and more information can be found in section 2.2 of the policy.

This year, and every year from now on, the annual covenant conversation will include a discussion about the supervisory relationship and whether there needs to be any change in supervisor and what timescale is feasible.

If there are good reasons why it would not be appropriate for you to be supervised by a particular individual (e.g. family relationship; personality clash) you should request that be taken into account with the keeper of the SIP. If this is difficult to raise with your own minister in oversight, please speak to the District Chair or to the dedicated MDO.

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Who can train to be a supervisor and how will that work?   

The holders of the District Supervision Implementation Plan (SIP) will nominate those ministers and lay members who should train to supervise.   Those nominated will be invited to register for the mixed-mode training course put in place by the church. This course requires:

  • Attendance at a 3 day residential training module ( Days 1-3)
  • Review of online learning modules provided by video
  • Practicing the skills of supervision both with a practice partner and through a dedicated online practice day ( Day 4)
  • Completion of course work
  • Reflection on supervision practice with a dedicated supervisor – this may be part of an existing supervisory relationship
  • Attendance at a 2 day online training module (Days 5&6) during which an assessment of ability will be made.

Ultimately, after this period of training and discernment, successful trainee supervisors will be approved to supervise under the Supervision Policy (2021-26) and subsequently be required to apply for reaccreditation every 5 years.

Special consideration is given to those with a Certificate or Diploma in Supervision obtained from a recognised body. They should first approach the District Chair for the geography in which they are based for advice and to establish where there is a need on the District SIP. Then they are encouraged to contact the dedicated MDO for further advice around requirements for familiarisation with Supervision in the Methodist Church and the route to accreditation to do so.

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Can I be part of the Responsible Grace (RG) training team? 

The RG training team is made up of a dedicated group of externally qualified professional supervisors, accredited members of the Learning Network and accredited supervisors from across the church. The church welcomes requests to join that team. Interested parties should contact the dedicated MDO for more information.

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How is supervision different from (a) line management, (b) coaching, (c) spiritual direction, (d) counselling?

It should be noted that although technical distinctions can be made, in practice, there is often considerable overlap between support and accountability mechanisms.  The most important thing is that both parties are clear what is expected.  Definitions of supervision for Methodist Church purposes are provided in section 1 of the Supervision Policy (2021-26).

(a) Supervision and line management: supervision is primarily exploratory and reflective; it is governed by an agreement (Covenant) between the supervisor and the supervisee and is recorded on an Agreed Record Form. Unlike line management it does not involve task management and the responsibility for the work remains with the supervisee.  If it becomes clear in supervision that action needs to be taken regarding a minister by their minister in oversight (who may or may not be the supervisor) this needs to be recorded on the Agreed Record Form so that action can be taken outside the supervision session. Management is defined in the recent 2021 conference report section 3.4. Special considerations are being given to provision for lay employees with significant pastoral responsibilities this could be offered either by the line manager or through a separate supervision route. Line managers will need to include reflective approaches within their conversations and guidance about how best to do that is offered in the regular line management training offered by the Learning Network across the Connexion.

(b) Supervision and coaching: coaching is usually governed by an agreement between the coach and the practitioner. It can govern any aspect of life or work by mutual agreement and is primarily focused on the development of the practitioner in some area. The accountability is usually purely between the two people concerned. Supervision involves attention to practitioner development (the formative dimension) but also to the ethics of practice within the organisation (the normative dimension) for the sake of those ministered amongst, and to the wellbeing of the practitioner (the formative dimension). The accountability within supervision is not only mutual, it is to the wider Church. For this reason the records are accessible to other processes and ministers in oversight may request that particular issues are taken to supervision.

(c) Supervision and spiritual direction: spiritual direction focuses on the living of life in the light of God's call to discipleship. For those in ministry this will include the living out of a vocation to ordination or lay work but will also include other relationships and commitments. Whilst supervision includes spiritual and theological perspectives, it focuses upon the wellbeing and spiritual health of the person as this concerns their practice. Practice is always the focus of supervision, even if the questions raised are theological or spiritual. 

(d) Supervision and counselling: counselling is focused upon the mental health of the client. Supervision may identify areas of work which are having an impact on the supervisee's mental health or areas of mental health that are having an impact on the supervisee's work. It is the role of supervision to explore these impacts but not to work specifically on any mental health concerns raised. Referral to counselling may sometimes be an outcome of supervision.

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How will I fit supervision in with everything else?

Ministry is the kind of life in which there is always more that could be done than time allows. It is recognised that supervision involves a major commitment both as a supervisee and as a supervisor. Research has shown benefits from both perspectives as all ministers have found supervision an effective way to reflect, to communicate with colleagues and to become more intentional about their priorities and use of time. Whilst supervision requires a substantial level of commitment the supervision space itself offers opportunity to discuss what good time management might look like for any individual including what to choose to do and to neglect whilst ministering in a given context.

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What is the relationship between supervision and safeguarding?

Supervision was introduced into the Methodist Church, in part, as a way to support a change of culture from isolated practice to more accountable, transparent and supported practice. It is expected that issues of safeguarding and other risks will be explicitly discussed in supervision as a regular part of the work and it is hoped that supervision will help ministers spot patterns of behaviour in others and themselves that are a cause for concern so that early interventions can be made. Supervision will not on its own prevent any individuals in ministry intent on harming others from doing so. However, it is hoped that supervision will help everyone to reflect on the impacts of their own patterns of working and take steps to work more safely, e.g. in taking appropriate time off, in observing the code of conduct, in sharing difficult decisions.

Supervisors should always remember that any supervisee may themselves be a survivor of abuse. For those ministers it is particularly important that basic protocols and appropriate boundaries are observed e.g. allowing the supervisee to help shape the supervision space; being clear about the limits and obligations of confidentiality; supporting the emotional welfare of the supervisee if a particular incident or situation is having a significant impact upon them; making referrals for further support if a need is identified.

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Is supervision confidential?

Supervision is not completely confidential because it is not only for the support of the practitioner, but for the wellbeing of those amongst whom the practitioner works. The Agreed Record asks for certain things to be recorded:

  • a list of topics so that any minister in oversight/designated third party can tell whether ministry is being discussed in the round during the course of a year,
  • specific actions relating to safeguarding, competence, discipline or other formal actions in order to be legitimately acted upon outside the supervision space, and
  • evidence that the supervision of others (where relevant) has been reflected upon at least once a year to ensure best practice is being maintained.

Anything not recorded on the form is confidential to the supervisor and the supervisee. Guidance about the keeping of records and informal note keeping can be found in the policy and in a dedicated FAQ below.

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Can we use group supervision?

The Supervision Policy (2021-26) and the associated report to conference highlight the ongoing considerations around the best use of group supervision in the church. At present group supervision is not recommended practice within the church, not because it is an unhelpful form of supervision but because of the limitations around trained supervisors with this skillset which is considered to be higher than that for individual supervision. New work to assess how group supervision can be best embedded within the life of the church is underway with particular attention being given to the training required. Ministers are of course encouraged to use skills of supervision across their work, including for encouraging reflection and colleagueship in staff meetings and other groups although this is a less formal approach than that which might be designated “group supervision”. 

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Can I train as a professional supervisor?

A small budget continues to be set aside for each of the next three years to build the Methodist Church's capacity to deliver supervision and supervision training at a professional standard.  If you are interested to engage in such training please contact the dedicated MDO who can explain more about the routes available or any bursaries on offer. You can also find out more here.

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What happens if I refuse to sign my agreed supervision record?

The record of each supervision session should be signed by supervisor and supervisee and forwarded to either the minister in oversight or a nominated third party if the supervisor is the minister in oversight. On the record should be a list of topics, any risks identified and any matters that require referral beyond the supervision process. Ideally supervisor and supervisee should agree and sign the record together. If there is disagreement about the record, the supervisee should add their comments in the appropriate box and sign these. If the supervisee refuses to sign the record, the supervisor should record this fact; the date on which the supervisee was offered and declined the opportunity to sign; and forward the record as normal. Any referrals noted on the record can then happen without the consent of the supervisee in order to safeguard the interests of others.

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How can Circuit Stewards and others feed into the Supervision Process?

There is no formal route by which local church and circuit officers are invited to feed into the supervision process. However, it is always possible for them to speak to the minister themselves and suggest issues that might be profitably considered in supervision; it is also possible to raise issues with the relevant minister in oversight who might also suggest to the minister concerned that they reflect on the comments made. It is hoped that ministers will be alert to the views of lay people and other colleagues about their ministry through any carefully considered feedback offered and they may choose to bring such comments to supervision to reflect on them as part of responsible practice.

Other more formal routes to offer feedback to ministers can be found through the Ministerial Development Review process and you can find out more about this both here and through your minister.

To help church and circuit stewards better understand supervision in the Methodist Church a leaflet has been produced and that can be found on the stewards pages of the website here

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How does supervision relate to the re-invitation process?

There is no direct relationship between supervision and re-invitation. It is hoped that supervision will provide an ongoing and realistic context for the evaluation of the minister’s relationships and effectiveness in their appointment, as well as inform any discernment, and that this will lead to fewer surprises in the re-invitation process. Ministers are encouraged to share the feedback they get from colleagues and lay officers of the church with their supervisors in a routine way.

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Can I be exempt from any part of the Supervision training?

The training programme to equip supervisors in the church, Responsible Grace, offers a robust and careful approach to supervision in the Methodist context.  Any exemptions to training through that route are limited to externally qualified supervisors already conversant with the dispositions and skills needed to supervise. Even then, familiarisation with the Methodist ethos of supervision as well as the preferred methodology is required.

Some ministers were trained in supervision before 2017, particularly to support probationers. Since then much has changed and supervisors for probationers, or indeed Ministers from Other Conferences & Connexions, must be trained additionally through the Responsible Grace course. 

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How do I train to supervise a probationer from 2021 onwards?

If you are supervising probationers you need to have been trained on a Connexional Supervision Training Course, Responsible Grace. As already mentioned those who have attended training prior to September 2017 will need to retrain under the current policy. Any district/circuit anticipating the appointment of a probationer must ensure that a suitable trained supervisor is named and accredited well ahead of appointment and that they can serve for the full 2 years of the probationary appointment without interruption. More information can be found here in the Probation Handbook.

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If I am already trained to supervise probationers what further training do I need?

If you are supervising probationers you need to have been trained on a Connexional Supervision Training Course, Responsible Grace. 

In addition, in order to supervise a probationer you need to complete one briefing day at the Queen’s Foundation. Part of this annually held day looks at specifics of supervising a probationer (which may be different to supervising a peer) the rest of the day includes spending time with your probationer. Since September 2020 this additional training can only be offered to those who are already accredited to supervise by the church.

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What is the relationship between supervision and Ministerial Development Review?

Ministerial Development Review (MDR) is a process that supports ministers both to grow in their ministry and to contribute to circuits and districts in their mission. It focusses on ministry in context and forms part of a suite of work sitting alongside the Reflective Supervision that Ministers are involved with.

MDR applies to all ministers (deacons and presbyters) in a circuit appointment or district appointment, and to all district chairs. It also applies to every minister who has entered into an agreement with a circuit to undertake pastoral responsibility in one or more local church.

A key feature of MDR is the annual review meeting where each minister is supported by a lay contributor and an ordained contributor as they reflect on their ministry. This provides an important opportunity for ministers to share their reflections, insights and hopes with others who have a responsibility for their well-being and for their growth in ministry. They will often work with others to obtain feedback from local church members and circuit post holders around aspects of ministry and consider the responses together in the meeting.

To complement that, forms are available to ensure that reflections and topics discussed in the supervision space throughout the year can be highlighted in MDR and similarly topics arising through the MDR discussions can be highlighted to the supervisor in case they warrant additional reflection. These can be found here in the section of the website relating to supervision forms.

Support materials for MDR are available elsewhere on the website but it is worth noting that they are being revised in readiness for September 2022 following the recent report to the Methodist Conference 2021.

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If I work part-time, what do I need to know in relation to supervision?

As a supervisee

  • The supervision offered to those in part time roles should be regularly spaced through the working year.
  • It is agreed that those working half time or less within the British Methodist Church receive not less than one hour of supervision per quarter. Those working between half and full time should receive between one and two hours of supervision per quarter according to their appointment.

As a supervisor

  • The supervision offered by those in part time roles should be regularly spaced through the working year.
  • Care should be taken to match part time supervisors with supervisees according to the need of provision and time available.

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I'm going on sabbatical - should I still attend/provide supervision?

As a supervisee

  • Any minister on sabbatical is entitled to receive their full quota of supervision but may, by negotiation with their supervisor, miss one supervision during that three-month period or alter the pattern of their supervision.

 As a supervisor

  • Any minister on sabbatical who supervises should not automatically undertake all the supervisions for their supervisees during the sabbatical year but should make appropriate and proportionate arrangements for the supervision of their colleagues. This should be by negotiation and should take into account each supervision relationship. In some cases it may be important to prioritise the continuity of the relationship and for the supervisor to conduct all the supervisions in an adjusted timetable; in other cases it may be appropriate for two or three supervisions to be offered by an alternative supervisor in order to balance the workload of the minister having a sabbatical year. Overall the supervisor should aim to reduce their supervision load in a sabbatical year by a quarter where possible.

Supervisees who are attending training to be a supervisor should not be supervised by someone who is scheduled to be on sabbatical. Similarly they should not be involved in the Responsible Grace training programme if they are due to take their sabbatical during the 6 month training period. The District SIP holder is required to be sensitive to this matter when training is encouraged.

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I'm on parental leave - what should I do? 

As a supervisee

  • Any minister on parental leave (SO 807a-c) should normally continue to be supervised on their ‘keeping in touch’ days.

As a supervisor

  • Any minister who takes parental leave for more than two months should notify the keeper of the relevant Supervision Implementation Plan so that alternative arrangements can be made for their supervisees.

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What should I do if I am off sick?

As a supervisee

  • Ministers who are signed off sick may not engage in supervision. Careful decisions should be made after their return about the level of supervision offered for the remainder of the relevant Connexional year.

As a supervisor

  • Any minister who supervises and is signed off sick may not supervise. Where this persists for more than two months, alternative arrangements should be made for the affected supervisees by the keeper of the Supervision Implementation Plan. Careful decisions should be made after their return to work about the level of supervision offered for the remainder of the relevant Connexional year.

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I have been suspended - what should happen?

As a supervisee

  • The supervision arrangements for ministers who are suspended should be reviewed by the keeper of the Supervision Implementation Plan in consultation with their minister in oversight.

As a supervisor

  • Where a minister who supervises is suspended, alternative arrangements should be made for their supervisees by the keeper of the Supervision Implementation Plan in consultation with their minister in oversight.

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I am a chaplain in a Methodist Independent School - should I be in supervision? 

Chaplains working in Methodist Independent Schools should now be in supervision offered either by a trained Methodist supervisor within the District or by a professional supervisor recognised by the Methodist Church and paid for by the school.

In either case the Agreed Records of Supervision should go to the District Chair and to the designated chaplain who shall act as a Nominated Third Party and keep the Methodist Independent Schools' Supervision Implementation Plan.

This should include lay chaplains and ministers of other churches as conditions of appointment.

The Chair of District is responsible for recording the supervision arrangements of any Methodist Independent School chaplain on their Supervision Implementation Plan for completeness.  A separate MIST SIP is also kept.

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I am a minister with permission to reside overseas - should I be in supervision?

Supervision arrangements on the basis of the principles articulated in the Supervision Policy should be agreed with the Stationing Advisory Committee.

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I am a minister with permission to serve in an appointment outside the control of the Church – should I be in supervision?

The Stationing Advisory Committee should stipulate individual supervision arrangements on the basis of the principles articulated in the Supervision Policy, ensuring that the hours of supervision are proportionate to the hours of work undertaken but not less than one hour each quarter.

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I am a minister with permission to be without appointment – should I be in supervision?

The Stationing Advisory Committee should check that those they grant permission to be without appointment are aware of the need still to be in supervision.

District Chairs with ministers who are without appointment residing in the district should contact them to make appropriate supervision arrangements for them. For those who are not working, the arrangement should be not less than one hour per quarter. For those who have permission to explore a variety of ministries, e.g. retreat ministry, a supervision arrangement should be made that is proportionate to the hours worked and the risks involved.

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I am a chaplain to the armed forces – what should I do?

The SIP for chaplains is held by the Secretary to the Forces Board and they will oversee arrangements for supervision across representatives within the Armed Forces. Each chaplain must be in receipt of a minimum of four supervisions of 90 minutes each year from a supervisor approved under the Methodist Church’s Policy. Agreed records shall be sent to the Secretary of the Forces Board. The reduced hours of supervision have been negotiated with reference to the other structures for support and accountability that are in place within the Armed Forces.

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Ordained ministers who are Recognised and Regarded, Authorised to Serve or Associates.

All such ministers should be included on the District Supervision Implementation Plan.

Those who are recognised and regarded by the Methodist Conference as being in Full Connexion are subject to the same discipline as those in Full Connexion. Therefore they should be in Supervision under the policy.

Those who are authorised to serve should be in supervision and included on the District Supervision Implementation Plan. In each case, there should be clarity as to supervision offered within the MCB, through the minister’s own Church, or both.

Those who are recognised in circuits as Associate Presbyters and Associate Deacons operate only in relation to specific functions that should be overseen by the Superintendent. The Superintendent should ensure that they are in receipt of supervision from their own Church and/or that the ministry they offer in the name of the MCB is appropriately supervised according to the principles outline in this report.

The (continued) authorisation of Authorised Presbyters and Deacons should be dependent upon the demonstration that appropriate supervision arrangements are in place either through the Methodist Church or via another body.

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I am a Pioneer Minister – should I be in supervision?

From September 2022 all lay and ordained pioneers should be in supervision as described in the policy and covered by the District Supervision Implementation Plan. The definition of a pioneer minister is anyone who is part of the Methodist Church Pioneer Pathway or has a job title that indicates the nature of their ministry as a pioneer working on the margins or with new communities. Supervisors should be briefed on the particular nature of this work.

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I am a Mission Partner – should I be in supervision?

The Director of Global Relationships shall provide annually to the designated MDO a Supervision Implementation Plan that covers presbyters and deacons and lay people identified above who are serving as mission partners.

Those in supervision should receive six 90 minute sessions (or nine 60 minute sessions) a year either from a trained supervisor in their context or (more likely) from a designated supervisor in Britain through an online route.

The agreed records of supervision should be sent to the Director of Global Relationships Office or an appropriate nominated person.

Those mission partners serving in Churches where there are supervision arrangements in place may (in agreement with the Director of Global Relationships) be supervised under the policy of the Church in which they serve but with agreed reports on the supervision sent to the Head of the World Church Relationships Office.

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Who should be on a Supervision Implementation Plan (SIP)?

It is the responsibility of the District Chair to ensure that supervision is provided for:

  • All ministers in the active work in, (or those Recognised and Regarded as being in) Full Connexion with the all probationers, those supernumeraries undertaking significant pastoral responsibility under a letter of understanding (SO 792(2)) and those authorised to exercise ministry on behalf of the British Methodist Conference ( under SO 733 or 733A)
  • All chaplains in Methodist Schools ( whether Methodist or of another denomination; whether lay or ordained); arrangements to be overseen by the Schools Visitor or appointed Chaplain
  • All Methodist chaplains and family workers in the Armed Forces (whether lay or ordained); arrangements to be overseen by the Secretary of the Forces Board
  • All tutors with oversight for Methodist Superintendent Ministers; arrangements to be overseen by the Head of Ministries
  • All ministers with permission to reside overseas, to serve in appointment outside the control of the Church or with permission to be without appointment; arrangements to be overseen by the SAC and the relevant District Chair
  • Ordained ministers of other churches authorised to serve by the Conference (Authorised Ministers) shall be included in the relevant SIP and supervised under the policy unless exempt under an equivalent scheme approved by the connexional ecumenical officer and the connexionally appointed officer for supervision
  • All mission partners who are ordained and lay people who are serving in appointments in which they have significant pastoral responsibility that is not line managed; overseen by the Director of Global Relationships.

From September 2022

  • All pioneer ministers (whether lay or ordained) who are working 0.5 to full time
  • All lay pastors working 0.5 to full time

From September 2024

  • Those in other lay roles who have significant pastoral contact with individuals and families at points of vulnerability (pastoral workers, family workers, community workers) and those pioneer ministers and lay pastors with significant representative authority working less than half time, according to a pattern of reflective supervision/group supervision/reflective management as determined by the Methodist Council.

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My role is split – who should offer supervision?

Where an ordained minister or lay officer/employee identified is in a split role an agreement should be made with the person concerned about the prime location in which supervision is best offered.

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I am Supernumerary - do I need to be in supervision?

Supernumeraries undertaking significant pastoral responsibility under a letter of understanding (SO 792(2)) should be in supervision as a means of support for the accountable exercise of ministry. The amount offered is commensurate with supervision for ministers in the active work but should be in proportion to the number of hours worked. It should be no less than an hour a quarter.

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How does Covid-19 affect supervision arrangements?

Supervision during the Covid-19 pandemic can continue without hesitation using online technology in place of face to face meetings. Guidance about how to approach supervision using such methodology can be found in the attached document.

Download guidance on receiving supervision while 'social distancing' (Pdf)

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My supervisee is leaving the British Connexion to return to their original sending context. What do I do with their records?

Records should be bundled (either electronically or on paper) and returned direct to the Supervision team at church house. They will arrange confidential storage until the minister returns to work in the UK, or until they die, whichever comes sooner.

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How are supervision records handled?

Guidance has been produced for all aspects of handling Supervision Records and has been shared with Supervisors in training. You can find it here.

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